Podcast: Cleaning up in México

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Digging for records can get dirty, very dirty. So we get to cleaning some of our grimiest records, many of which we found in México and Colombia. DJs China Tu Madre, Papicultor, Smokestack, and Pozole all in La Sala sharing some filthy good music.

Tracklist:

Baja 3

Los Hermanos Flores Otra Vez

Los Hermanos Flores – Flor de Pithaya

Baja 4

Los Sonadores de la PazEl Sudcaliforniano

Baja 2

Miguel Angel LizarraTu Mi Destino

Manuel CelestinoNaciste Bonita

Baja 5

Grupo LaserBuscalo

Baja 3

Los Hermanos FloresLa Paz

Baja 4

Los Sonadores de la PazLlegando a la Paz

Baja 3

Los Hermanos FloresTodos Santos

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Acapulco Tropical – La Pollera Amarilla

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Ray BarrettoHipocresía y Falsedad

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Ismael RiveraTraigo Salsa

Bobby SmallCompas de Cumbia

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Grupo Miramar – Cerro Hermoso

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Andrés LanderoNoche de Cumbia

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Acosta y sus TremendosY Me Critican

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Hermanos Martinez de Allende, N.L. – Bailando en Shorts

Podcast: The Accordion Episode with Marié Abe

The accordion, one of the most fascinating, unique and without question culturally important musical instruments that all of us pelangueros can’t get enough of. Yet to be honest, we actually know very little about these squeezable typewriter-looking devices. That is why we knew we had to dedicate an entire episode to the accordion and why we were so excited to welcome Professor of Ethnomusicology at Boston University, Co-Producer of Public Radio International’s Squeeze Box Stories and bad-ass acordeonista of the group Debo BandMarié Abe. Listen as we learn about the accordion’s origins and its travels through Europe, Africa, the Americas and all the way to Japan.

 

Tracklist:
Ferew HiluEshururu
Debo BandAmbassel
Debo BandDC Flower
Los Cholos de PastoCumbia de O. Vreeskin
Alejo DuránMi pedazo de acordeón
Squeezebox Stories – Trailer
Los YukinosDe party con las malandrinas
Los PerlasTener o no tener
El Cieguito de NaguaLa bailadora
José Santiago VegaNo me hable estrujao
北原謙二 – 銀座パチャンが通り  (Kenji KitaharaGinza Pachanga)
Ferro GaitaTareza
Petar RalchevTo the north of Bulgaria
Fred FrithHands of the juggler

You can also listen, download and subscribe to our podcast in iTunes. Please let us know what you think and leave us a review.

Podcast: Colombia!

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In our previous podcast we loved having Daniel French of Las Cafeteras in La Sala so much that we brought him back. We also welcomed the super talented Bardo Martinez, lead singer, guitarist and organist from Chicano Batman into La Sala. Hosts May-Li (dj china tu madre) and Federico (dj papicultor), who have just returned from the Festival Petronio Álvarez in Cali, Colombia, give us a first hand guide through one of the most musically rich areas of the world. A special night full of beautiful stories, impromptu singing, savory arrechón, and irresistible records.

You can also listen, download and subscribe to our podcast in iTunes. Please let us know what you think and leave us a review.

 

Playlist:

  1. Alejandro Durán – El Aborrecido
  2. Andres LanderoCanto Negro
  3. Ondatrópica – Homenaje a Andres Landero
  4. Ondatrópica – Cien Años (Markitos Micolta on vocals)
  5. Peregoyo y Su Combo Vacaná – El Mundo Al Revés
  6. La Contundencia Chirimía – Fiesta San Pachera
  7. Grupo Saboreo – Kilele (live at the Loma de la Cruz in Cali)
  8. Grupo Socavón de Timbiquí – Quitate De Mi Escalera (Nidia Góngora on vocals)
  9. Live Recording at Escuela Canalón in Cali – Rio Timbiqui

Podcast: Egypt and beyond

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Hosts Arjuna (dj smokestack), Jacobo (dj pozole), Federico (dj papicultor), and May-Li (dj china tu madre) welcome special guest Daniel French from one of the hottest bands from East LA Las Cafeteras to La Sala. Our vinyl journey begins with classic sounds from Egypt then continues onto Tanzania, Zaire and Colombia before returning to California to connect the old with the new.

You can download and subscribe to it for free on iTunes along with all our previous episodes. Leave a review and let us know what you think.

 

Podcast – Episode 1

Please excuse our recent absence from this space. We’ve been doing some remodeling and maintenance, but we’re back now! We’re still very excited to continue sharing more music and culture. In fact, last week we got together and recorded our very first Pelangacast live from our LP clubhouse! The concept is not to have the typical radio “programmed show,” but instead to invite you into our cozy wall-to-wall collection of culture on vinyl as we share stories and discoveries from our musical addictions.

Below is our first episode with more to come soon. Have a listen, and let us know what you think.

 

Playlist

  1. Intro
  2. Advice – I. C. Rock
  3. Ce La Vie – Les Difficiles De Pétion-Ville
  4. Ah Ah Oh No – La Protesta (ft. Joe Arroyo)
  5. El Preso – Louis Towers [NOTE: This unlabeled record was in a Grupo Kuwait sleeve, but it’s actually Louis Towers]
  6. (Where Were You) Last Night – Sumy
  7. Banana Juana – Ralph Robles
  8. Guami Guami – Sir Victor Uwaifo and his Melody Maestros
  9. Jessie – Kanda Bongo Man

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Alejo Durán on Black History Month

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This is as good a month as any to invite Alejo Durán, el Rey Negro Vallenato, to tell us a bit of American history. This is “Los Hermanos Negros”, from the album I posted a few weeks ago

That reminds me of “El Indio Sinuano”, a strong, proud track on Zenú history written by David Sánchez Juliao. It’s a simple thing, but the break at 3:20 is one of my favorites in vallenato. I don’t think I have the energy to translate the lyrics to the English speakers, but I’m sure the internet does. You can find them here

papicultor

Alejo Durán – El legendario caballero del canto vallenato

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Este post va para Carlos Mendoza — el joven inquieto de 51 años que está tratando de redefinir el sonido de la música chilena de Oaxaca desde el Valle Central de California — y para las cumbiamberas Marië y Julie, que cuentan un poquito de la historia de Carlos en el radiodocumental Squeezebox Stories (When are you writing a guest post for us?)

Pajarito by Alejo Durán

I’ve met several accordionists from all over the world (and Carlos is one of them) who, when they find out I am from Colombia, won’t stop raving about the virtuoso accordionists in vallenato. And yes, no doubt I agree, and I love listening to them, but I keep coming back to the down-home vallenateros who leave the fancy tricks aside, who keep it simple and honest and deep. Not many do that better than Alejo Durán.

Anything I try to write about Alejo Durán is outdone by a beautiful chronicle written by Alberto Salcedo in the book “Diez juglares en su patio”, where Alejo talks about his love for accordion, women, and his sombrero vueltiao, his  disinterest in alcohol and new vallenato, and his encounters with Gabriel García Márquez. (Muy recomendado este libro, si lo consiguen! El último libro de Salcedo también está buenísimo.) So maybe I’ll just let them talk, and hope my translation doesn’t get too much in the way:

Alejo: “When someone talks to me about fingering, it is as if they talk to a deaf man. I have nothing to do with fingering. I am an accordionist of style. […] I don’t crack my fingers trying to make the notes run fast, but I assure you that I have my style, and if you hear me from far away you will now that it is me who is playing. You’ll mix up the other accordion players. Not me.”

If you want style, check out his accordion work in this song, especially towards the end; I never heard anything quite like this.

Nazira by Alejo Durán

Alejo, father of 24 children, “all with the same one but with many different women” says “…I had to be in love to keep composing. Or heartbroken. Because, really, there are two topics to compose about: love and sorrow. Everything else is make-believe, and I don’t like to make things up. […] If some guy can get excited singing about lies, things that haven’t happened, let him do that. We, the old guys, prefer to sing about what happens to us.”

Cuerpo Cobarde by Alejo Durán

Salcedo: “Durán’s main merit is that he understood that the accordion has its voice, and it’s important to let it speak. Not like most of today’s interpreters, for whom the accordion is simply an instrument; as if it wasn’t an extension of our feelings.”

Durán: “My life, my trusted friend, and part of my soul is the accordion. I tell my secrets to him.”

Son Pesares by Alejo Durán

Enjoy,

papicultor